Use Your Intuition for Podium Recognition

imagesIntuition is the gut feeling or insight that we all experience, but too often we allow our intellect to overrule the ‘sotto voce’ in our heads.

Many emergency workers whose job it is to keep people safe, trust their intuition inexplicably and act upon it immediately without questioning.  Like the story of the firefighter, who dousing a seemingly easily managed fire, knows instantly at gut level that he has to get out of the building.  He makes it out just in time to witness the building’s massive collapse and its eruption into a blazing inferno.

Intuition is an immediate knowing, a first flush of thought before the intellect tries to reason it out. It provides us with a sense of knowing that this is the right or wrong course to take, the decision to make or the person to trust or distrust.

Albert Einstein, a believer in the power of imagination and intuition said  “The intuitive mind is a sacred gift and the rational mind is a faithful servant.  We have created a society that honors the servant and has forgotten the gift”.

6In public speaking, intuition will unfailing guide you to a greater speech and a more dynamic performance.  Use intuition to edit your speech and guide your choice to pick the holistic memory chunks or prompts to keep you on track at the lectern.  Use your intuition to measure the response of the audience so that you can refine or add to your words if needed.  At question time let it direct you diplomatically in your response to each of the questions

Encourage your intuitive ability  by choosing to become more aware of that gut feeling, that small voice in your head.  Challenge yourself to identify  who may be on the caller on phone when it rings or when standing at a bank of elevators ask which one will arrive first.  So at first you maybe wrong – but the more you practice the intuitive message becomes undeniably evident.

 Mary Atkins – Author of the definitive self-help guide to public speaking  Finding Your Voice – ten steps to successful public speaking.    Available in two editions  (same content but different covers) throughout the world and now on Kindle.

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Or you can purchase the book direct from me $A25 plus postage –  go to Contact Me on this website.

 

 

Friday Tips for Speakers – Win an audience – speak to time

Speak to Time
Speak to Time

My pet peeve as a former conference and event organiser is  a presenter who does not speak to their allotted and agreed time.  I have known many a speaker, watch draped over the lectern, me zipping my finger across my throat each time  we made eye contact, continue on without any sign of chagrin, some 10 minutes-plus over time.

Four reasons why you SHOULD and COULD speak to time.

The audience are more inclined to absorb a speaker’s presentation if they run to time.  Speakers who run over time are evaluated poorly by the audience, seemingly their frustration obstructs the quality of the message.

Consideration for others:  Often one over-time speaker will cause a snowball effect with other speakers running late as they become stressed with the longer wait to ‘go on.’   Carefully timed agendas are disrupted. Refreshment breaks and meal service delayed.

Prepare & Rehearse: Speakers running overtime are slack. It comes down to preparation. You need to thoroughly rehearse and time your presentation. When rehearsing at home make sure that it comes in under the allotted time given by organisers.  Because the performance you give at home is generally at a faster pace than the one you give on centre stage. Double check your itinerary and speaking notes or disc before leaving home. (I once had a keynote speaker who arrived with the wrong disc for his Powerpoint presentation and had to wing it which caused him to run horribly late.)

Want a repeat gig? Then speak to time. Be professional. Organisers    of events and conferences hate their work to be compromised and will cross a tardy speaker off their talent list.